Sunday, 15 September 2013

English and Irish









We have two official languages in Ireland and the video below
gives great clarity on the matter.





The enthusiasm shown by these young people
to entertain in their own language will surely  keep 
the Irish language alive.


13 comments:

  1. I don;t think I have ever actually heard it spoken before, so I found that very interesting.

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    1. That's an awful shame because Irish is a beautiful and rich language which actually had an input into the English language.

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  2. I really enjoy hearing the Irish language spoken and am fascinated by the differences in Irish spoken across the island.
    My grandmother was a native Manx speaker, sadly the language wasn't passed down to me,
    and it was almost lost on the Isle of Man.
    As you say it's great to see young people speaking and promoting Irish.

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    1. Thank you for your comment and interest Jane. I understand that Manx is closely related to Irish and in it's written form appears to be an almost phonetic form of Irish.

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  3. Isn't language wonderful? I was fascinated to see everything in both Irish and English when I had a long weekend in your beautiful country a few years ago. I also think it is great that this beautiful celtic (is it celtic?) language is being kept alive by young people. It seems very sad to me that so many old languages are dying out, and that's mainly because the young people don't speak them. Well done Ireland! I wish I understood it though!

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  4. Oops, yes of course it's Celtic. Misha says so in the video doesn't he? Senior moment :-p

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    1. Hello Val, you are totally forgiven for the faux pas :)

      Many thanks for your comment.

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  5. I'm being a bit scatty today. I forgot to say the second video is lovely! All those singularly Irish arts rolled into one. It's gorgeous!

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    1. Well Val this being Sunday, I think that you are allowed to relax the brain as well as the body - don't you ? ? ?

      Oddly the only traditional instrument that I did not notice being played on the video was the bodhran.

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  6. the song was beautiful. Gaelic is now being taught in some schools here, hope it becomes popular with all the young ones. My granddaughter may teach me. I think it is quite a difficult language to learn.
    Margaret xxx

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    1. Thank you for your words Margaret and good to see you writing on the blog.

      Glad to read that Scotland is strengthening its heritage via Scots Gaelic. Learning the language the easier way is to learn a a few phrases at a time and gradually build from there, I think.

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  7. I love the musical sound of the Irish language and you already know that Irish music is our music of choice. Interestingly I have got a detainee this week whose first language is Irish. He does speak English perfectly too, but his written English is not good. We quite often find this with detainees whose first language is Welsh xxx

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    Replies
    1. Am enjoying the reading of your comments Fran !
      Yes quite literally preference is always given to the first language and why not... even here there are the occasional errors made on road signs. A few years ago a sign on the outskirts of Tipperary Town used to read: It's along way to Tipperary instead of 'a long way'.
      You will have to get him to educate his teachers with a few Irish phrases in exchange ?

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