Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Shorelines

This is my five-hundredth blog post and the last photos of our recent holiday
on the West coast of Co Clare.


It would be fair to title this photo 'Ancient and Modern'.
In the foreground is the traditional curach which has been in use for centuries 
by the inshore fishermen of Ireland.



Modern lobster and crab pots made of steel.
My eye was caught by the high trees, so close to the shore, an unusual sight
in this part of Clare for you can travel for miles without seeing any at all.




The glorious limestone of the Burren dominates all 
and provides an eye stopping backdrop.



The small harbour of Ballyvaghan and a large old anchor




The houses of Ballyvaghan seem to cling to the shore for survival, 
squashed as they are between the Burren hills and the sea.



Further along the coast is Fanore beach with its sand dunes. 
I imagine that it may be a good place to fish with a rod and line 
given the right conditions.



In the foreground are the feeding grounds of sea birds as well as herons and egrets.
The rocky isles are almost totally covered by the high tides each day.




Night falls slowly and the sea has a particular look about it 
that says winter is not far away.




The ever-present elements of wind powered waves crash upon coastal rocks
to shape the land that we call home.

****

My great appreciation and thanks to everyone who visits and reads this blog
and please leave me a comment for it is nice know who has visited.





34 comments:

  1. Lovely, lovely post, friend H … I cherish my time on your side and this side of the Atlantic … in fact I cherish any ocean experience … Love, cat.

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    1. Thanks Cat and goodness me you were very quick off the mark ! This blog post has only been up a couple of minutes :) xx

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  2. This is very beautiful, though it all looks a bit cold to me. But not as cold as my home in northeast Ohio.

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    1. Thank you for your comments Thickethouse and pleased to hear from you. Ireland weather wise is known as a temperate country meaning that it is rarely hot and only occasionally very cold. On the last day of our holiday it was 7 deg C and today it is 4 deg C. I have no idea how this compares to northeast Ohio.

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  3. Well done Mel - love seeing the curragh and your little additions to the delightful photos of that area - yes winter is a-coming ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hello Hilary thank you for your appreciation. Winter is already here it is cold and damp as per usual for the time of the year and a good turf fire is sending out lots of heat.

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  4. Congratulations on your 500th blog post, that's quite an achievement.

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    1. Thank you very much Sue and do you know that a couple of times I very nearly quit.

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  5. A wonderful description of your land
    I wish I could see and enjoy it myself. Thank you

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    1. LA wait until May when the weather gets warmer and then step on a plane and see all that you can.
      Thanks for commenting.

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  6. Lovely photographs Heron - you have really captured the spirit of the area.

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    1. Hello Weave, am so glad that you enjoyed the photographs and your comments are greatly appreciated.

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  7. breathtaking..incentive for me to travel to Ireland to see where some of my (London Irish)family came from

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    1. Yes GZ please do come and visit. You might even find a few more relatives too :)
      Thank you for the comment.

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  8. I like that curach. Those sorts of round bottomed boats look like they could be tippy if you don't stay down low in them. Not too different from the dugout canoes used traditionally here in Belize.

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    1. Many thanks for your comment Wilma. A curach is made with a wooden/wicker-work frame, over which animal skins or hides were stitched together and painted with five coats of tar. Today the modern curach is sheeted with glass fibre coloured black. They are propelled by oars or sails according to circumstances, today it is not unusual to see an outboard motor attached to the stern. Users do stand in them on occasions though according to sea conditions,

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  9. I've never lived by the water before.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Looking out at the sea on any day is never boring always something to see or listen to even when foggy.

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  10. So much of that, particularly the houses clinging to the shoreline, of parts of the West Coast of Scotland. there is a great deal which we share.

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    1. We do indeed Graham have similarities in our lives and I doubt that you would ever want to live anywhere else.

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  11. You make the world more beautiful. Thanks!

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    1. That is a very kind of you Mitchell but I only share what is see.

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  12. It is always a pleasure to share comments with you, both here and on my blog. Thank you and long may it continue.

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    1. Oh Rachel you are most kind, I do so appreciate your generosity x

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  13. Very poetic - your last pic description.

    You've captured the essence of your little part of the world and thanks for sharing with us. Oh and I like that anchor. Seems like it's dying to rock from side to side - just a bit when no one is looking. Ha!

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    1. Many thanks Wendy for your appraisal of the blog content and I think you are right about the anchor having a private rock and roll session when nobody is about :)

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  14. Everyone loves it whenever people come together and share opinions.
    Great site, keep it up!

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  15. I admit that I have been remiss in my attention to the world of blogging for some time now. The pressure of running a business and visits still from the Black Dog are mainly to blame..
    But it is so nice to start feeling part of the blogosphere once more and even more so to happen upon your 500 post my friend ... I love the sea and the coast and your words stir up the desire to feel salt laden spray stinging my face once more....

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    1. Thank you for your comment and your news John - you have been missed you know :-)

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  16. What lovely photos of a beautiful place, you are indeed fortunate. Sorry about not commenting for a long time..

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    1. Thelma thank you for commenting, am so glad that you liked the scenery.

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  17. Beautiful photo's of a truly special place. How fortunate you are to live there - the scenery is stunning.

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  18. Thank you for your appreciation and comment Louise; I do so agree with you !

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