Wednesday, 30 May 2018

A Place of Interest

On our travels we often find interesting places, like the one below which is almost hidden from sight by shrubbery. It is the ruins of a gate lodge belonging to a once large coastal demesne of Finavarra House in Co Clare, built in the 1800's.

I expect if it had a voice there would have been some interesting stories it could relate.
Perhaps the gate keeper would utter tales about his employers coming and going at all hours of the day and night and talk of their visitors, those who would tip him well or those who would speak kindly to him and those who would not.



There is enough of the lodge remaining that it would be an interesting project
to renovate and carefully modernise the old building.




The gate has gone now and has been replaced with a modern tubular field gate
so that only the stout stone pillars remain.



All of the windows and the doorway have cut stone features.




Through the front window you can glimpse the interior. 
I can only imagine that it was once a cosy home with a roaring fire here on the hearth.



A superb view of the coastal waters would have been seen from the lodge.

Wouldn't you love to see this view as you woke each morning ?



20 comments:

  1. With a view like that it's a wonder the Lodge hasn't been renovated already. I've noticed that such gatehouses are often architecturally interesting, with all kinds of quirky features.

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    1. This is one of the differences between Ireland and England, that by and large people have a different set of values when it comes to old buildings. The majority would rather build a new house than bring an old one
      up to modern standards.

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  2. Hi Mel - absolutely doesn't it look wonderful ... and as you say I bet the building has stories to tell ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary when I was taking the photo's I could almost hear the building talking to me... thank you for commenting.

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  3. I would love to see that view each morning! I hope it was a kindly gate keeper who lived there.

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    1. You are not alone in admiring that view and I think that if I lived there then I would probably be taking a photo every day to record the different changes of light and mood.

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  4. Jack L said:
    It just seems such a shame that such a well-built structure would be let to go to 'rack and ruin'...when it has outlived its usefulness or purpose. Obviously it was built to last, and the stone carvings are something that you just don't see built anymore. Too bad someone couldn't clear off the vegetation and fix-it up...in Angela's home town Witney, builders would be able to fix up a doghouse into a decent property and someone would buy it..!! I sat here looking out the window...at the fresh green trees/grass thinking how nice that fireplace would have looked blazing away, while the cottage kept out the Irish rains.

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    1. Thanks for your comments Jack. I rather thought that place would take your fancy, just as it did mine too;
      For the air there would be a delightful treat to the lungs and then there is the possibility of having a plentiful supply of fresh fish etc.

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  5. Oh what a spot. I’d be tempted.

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    1. Hell Mitchell I guess that might be tempted on a sunny day, would you though on a wet one with a strong wind blowing. That is the question ? :)

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  6. Great photos. Don't think I have ever seen so many derelict buildings like the one's we see in Ireland.

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    1. I know Dave it used to puzzle me until I worked out why. It is that people prefer to leave the past behind them and live in a new build.

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  7. Lovely pictures and article, friend H ... Reminds me of an elderly British couple I took care off ... about 25 years ago in our local senior's lodge ... and they were elderly alright ... smiles ... but such a delight to be with ... so I didn't mind the only Can $6.50/ hour ... He died age 97 and she followed him age 103 ... He loved to tell stories that he was born in a stone cottage and how it was growing up there ... She played the piano for many gatherings in that lodge ... They were lovely and dignified ... I will never forget them ... as being immigrants to Canada themselves, they always treated this gypsy girl with respect ... smiles ... Love, cat.

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  8. Thank you Cat for recalling your memory as a carer of two dignified lodge dwellers. Little did they know that you would bring them to mind and write about them on a blog about an lodge years later.

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  9. Love everything about this post! Especially the view.
    Almost looks as though a leprechaun might pop out of the shrubbery, clicking his heels together and winking knowingly. About what? Who knows, they love to keep us guessing. LOL.

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    1. Thanks for the comments Wendy.
      It seems as if you have had personal experiences of Leprechauns ?

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    2. Heavens no. I just have a good imagination. :-)

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  10. I am fortunate enough to have 'that' view every morning when I wake in my own home.

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