Tuesday, 7 November 2017

In Celebration of Samhain

Yes it is Samhain today !


Cairn L at Loughcrew, Co. Meath where on one stone the
Samhain sun shines.



Samhain is the last of the Fire Festivals and the penultimate before Winter Solstice [Grianstad an Gheirnhridh] after which the first celebration is the Birth of the New Sun (New Year) [An bhlian úr agus breith an ghrian nua]

All that is written above is not old folk lore yarns. It is factual and can be proved by astronomical calculations/observations.

The druids of today such as me are as keenly aware what is going on in the sky above their heads as were the people of eight thousand years ago. It is to those wise people, men and women that we applaud for having constructed the mounds/cairns so very carefully that the light of the sun is able to shine in on set dates throughout the year to illuminate particular stones the backwalls.

I have two examples to share with you as proof of what I am saying,
both of the places are of equal importance, as are all of the mounds throughout Ireland and elsewhere.

The Mound of the Hostages at Tara and Cairn L at Loughcrew. 
Both of them situated in Co. Meath and several miles apart, there are as I have said many other mounds in Ireland most of which have never been opened or excavated and perhaps that is a good thing too.




The Mound of the Hostages at Tara in Co. Meath
at Samhain.

Well, now last night I set out a poem and thinking it finished I went to bed to sleep soundly. Then on arising glanced again at what had been written and added a a few lines more. So here it is for your perusal :


SAMHAIN'S BIRTH.


Thrown back in time
No fault of my own.

As watery light falls
Greenly through glass

While fumes flow lazily
Up black chimney stack

Smiling smoke turf flavoured
An ambrosian dessert for all

On this ancient day
Ruled by sullen sky

SAMHAIN has birthed
A new season

and
Winter is her name

born on
 7th November 2017

Heralded by a shaft of Light
in Tara’s Mound of the Hostages.

© MRL 7/11/17


20 comments:

  1. My son's birthday today ... He was born November 07 at 0727hs and weighed 7 pounds and 7 ounces ... Anyway ... ya ... Love, cat.

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  2. Hi Mel - I know you have a huge interest in the Gaelic festivals ... lovely poem celebrating Samhain ... love the photos - cheers Hilary

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    1. Much appreciated Hilary and thank you.

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  3. Inspirational poem. A delight to read.

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  4. JACK L said : Many Blessings to you as well and my thanks for sending the great link ! This would be the time to be in Ireland..wouldn't it ? I'm going to take some time to quietly review and read your poetry.

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    1. Thank you for the comment Jack and yes it would indeed be a fine time to be in Ireland.

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  5. Great poem. Interesting info on Samhain

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    1. Thank you L.A.
      Re the information about Samhain. I thought that it was about time that I set things straight for am tired of reading all the B.S. that is written by some people who ought to know better.

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  6. Thinking of Newgrange when I saw that barrow

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    1. Yes Simon they are similar, thank you for the comment.

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  7. I thought of Newgrange too, one of my favorite places in Ireland. Your poem painted a vivid picture, enjoy the celebration.

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    1. Thank you Janet, my head is swirling :-)

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  8. Feliz Samhain (I don't know what the proper phrase would be). Beautiful poetry.

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  9. I'm a bit late to wish you a wonderful Sahmain festival, but I loved the poem and your photos. What marvellous images, both in words and pictures!

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  10. The Standing Stone of Callanish on Lewis have had many interpretations put on their astronomical significance.

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  11. Yes Graham I have been reviewing some of the ideas about your stones one of which now states
    "As it now exists the ring is composed of thirteen stones, the tallest being 15.5 feet tall (4.72 meters) and weighing 5 - 6 tons. While there is no scientific agreement, it is generally believed that Callanish functioned as an astronomical calendar associated with the moon and that it accurately marked the 18.61 year cycle of maximum lunar declination."

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