Friday, 16 June 2017

SLUGS FOR SUPPER

Our supper this evening contained, in amongst the crispy green salad leaves, that not so rare a specimen known as  Arion distinctus Eire or the Irish green slug and yet when treated with the culinary skills that
the dearly loved Mrs H possesses, are also known as Dolmades. 
There were as you can see five of them on my plate, wrapped in giant Irish shamrock leaves, which were grown in our own garden. They were then cooked and pickled gently in white Guinness for seventy two hours, drained and finally stored in a cool place for four weeks ‘till matured.




The Arion distinctus Eire were utterly delicious, very filling as you can no doubt imagine and put the rest of the meal’s ingredients as nice as they were, in the shade.
Mrs H’s skills as a dedicated nocturnal Slug hunter are renowned for miles around. Neighbours have been known to drive to our boundaries with their night glasses and notebooks following her at a safe distance as she makes her selection from a large herd of well fed slithering Irish slugs.


A Slug Supper


And so I wish you bon appΓ©tit!

For further information and recipes -
http://www.eattheweeds.com/are-slugs-edible-what-about-snails-2/

38 comments:

  1. Ye gods and little fishes. What are you eating?

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  2. I really do not know whether this is a true tale or a bit of Irish blarney!

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  3. Ohhhh i would imagine a very good source of protein! I find the common english garden slug a little chewy ...........

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    1. Possibly the lack of giant irish shamrock leaves?

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    2. O yes of course !
      Yes, you are correct and do you know I never thought of that. How clever you are :-)
      That's it in a nutshell.

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  4. There are few things that really scare me, I deal with snakes, spider s and alligators here. But believe it or not I'm terrified of slugs and snails, to the point of almost fainting when coming upon one. Can't imagine eating one.

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    1. I certainly would not recommend you to eat a slug unless it is the very rare Irish green variety. Although I have enjoyed several platefuls of escargot cooked in garlic butter over the years and their flavour is rather like lamb but chewier.

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  5. Strange. The 1st April is long gone. As for white Guinness - credit us with some gumption.

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    1. Indeed ! Tut, tut, tut, Graham little do you know - go you here and see for yourself
      http://adland.tv/content/guinness-declares-its-introducing-guinness-white

      [wink!]

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    2. Yes. And the date of that was - as you know - 1 April 2008. Wink indeed!

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    3. Sometimes I feel like having a bit of craic with my friends, my friend 😐

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  6. Replies
    1. Well, you have tried Dolmades haven't you Lizbet ?
      Unless you mean in their raw state in which case you will need to speak with Mrs H 😐

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    2. And why not? I thought it was rather a good one too.

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    3. Thanks and Good night to you.

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  7. Been there, done that, friend H ... hedgehog, squirrel and horse, roadkill is not bad either, when u hungry ... I know cuz this lil girl grew up on it ... smiles ... Love always, cat.

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    1. Hello Cat thanks for your comment, have you had dinosaur too :-)

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    2. ... that's too funny, friend H ... Sadly dinos are distinct ... but I am not ... smiles ... Wishing a very good week end ... Love, cat.

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  8. Yikes. I couldn't do it... But I do admire the artistry.

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    1. Oh you do know the rhyme 'Slugs and snails and Puppy Dog's Tails' it is as real as that :-)

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  9. You do have your unique food fetishes!!! For eating in the wild, I might stick to basic venison as I don't have the skills of Mrs. H.... or maybe something wrapped in wild grape leaves.

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    1. Hello Gwen !
      It is getting near to Summer Solstice you see and the strangest of ideas tumble out of our heads.

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    2. You have a keen sense of adventure Mel. never loose it!!!

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    3. O thank you kind lady !
      I have just related your comment to Mrs H who nodded in agreement and then giggled.

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    4. I meant never "lose" it!! cheers

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    5. Gwen I rather like both versions actually, so I do :-)

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  10. Hi Mel - snails yes, slugs no ... dolmades yes ... a tale too far to contemplate for supper! But interesting to read ... have an enjoyable summer solstice ...cheers Hilary

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    1. Ha' ha' Hilary !
      You see whenever I see Dolmades I always think of Slugs and it was so simple to make it into a teasing tale 😐😐

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  11. I thought you were a vegetarian!!!

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    1. Only when I cannot find a juicy green slug m'dear :-)

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  12. Mel, you almost had me there, but when you got to the point of pickling them, my belief was suddenly suspended - that and the very idea that Mrs H would go slug hunting at night with a band of watchers on her heels. Wonderful bit of story telling! Bon appetit!

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    1. Hello Val thank you for the comment and am so glad that you enjoyed my summer's tale :-)

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  13. Like yourself Mel, we have housed our Slug hunters in a Palace, but they always appear to be in a hurry to get the job done as, all you can hear is them shouting "Quack Quack" they must be the northern clan of Slug hunters.
    Enjoyed the crack you inspired, crafty ould Druid arent you

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    1. Crafty ! What me crafty ?
      Well you know the old saying Flor 'No good getting older unless you get craftier'
      Thanks for the comment glad and to see that you found your way here at last 😐😐😐

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