Saturday, 3 June 2017

" For the freedom of this island our people died"



Recent additions to the Mountmellick Monument.


Lights and Names of Comrades


and more names of those who gave....


and hand crafted benches.


 made by a local craftsman.


We are fortunate to have statements from some of Mountmellick people who took an active part in the liberation of Ireland. One of those was the Adjutant of 4th Battalion, Laois Brigade James Ramsbottom, of O’Moore Street, Mountmellick, Co. Laois. 

“On 23 April 1916, when the Military Council of the Irish Republican Brotherhood finalised arrangements for the Easter Rising, it integrated Cumann na mBan, along with the Irish Volunteers and Irish Citizen Army, into the 'Army of the Irish Republic'. Patrick Pearse was appointed overall Commandant-General and James Connolly Commandant- General of the Dublin Division.”


Wherever there was an IRA Battalion or an Active Service Unit [Flying Column] there was also a unit of the  Cumann na mBan [the women’s organisation] that did great work in providing support in the fight towards an independent Ireland.

“Looking through the records of this amazing period, one cannot help but be struck by the modernity of these women. For all their studied antiquarianism and the plundering of Ireland’s distant past for inspiration, they were very much of their own time. Many were highly educated, three out of the six women in the Second Dáil were graduates. They earned their own living, demanded equal pay and were independent minded, bold and confrontational. The women were prepared to defy convention and break rules. It was to warlike heroines such as Granuaile and Maeve rather than more conventionally ‘feminine’ women like Emer that they looked for role models.

According to IRA Commandant Michael Brennan, the flying columns would have collapsed without Cumann na mBan. “In despatch carrying, scouting and intelligence work, all of which are highly dangerous, they did far more than the soldiers . . . the more dangerous the work the more willing they were to do it.”






14 comments:

  1. It must have been such a distinct time and period in history. Warm greetings.

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    1. Hello Blogo ! Good to hear from you. Yes, it is hard to imagine what those times must have been like, especially after all the previous failed attempts of achieving liberty.

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  2. I have been to Ireland a few times on driving holidays and each time I have beeb struck by the amazing interest there is in the country'a past.

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    1. Hello Weave, I am rather surprised that you found it amazing that the people here in Ireland are interested in their past. Considering the people of England are proud of their history as are the populations of many countries.

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  3. What a poignant memorial, Mel. It must have been moving to be there!

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    1. Thank you Val the memorial is a tribute to all those people who took part in the war of independence and the people of today whose brave ideas slowly and continually shape this nation.

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  4. Hi Mel - interesting memorial and it's good that they are adding names to it. Good to know about the women who took part - a century later ... it seems so far away, yet so close in so many others ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary,
      Thank you and hope that you have followed the link that I gave to read in greater detail the women's heroic contribution.

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  5. Our history is important no doubt and it is equally important to make memorials of those who believed in something great and sacrificed their lives for it. I only wish the memorials of our times should be of people putting themselves aside in acts of love for the fellow human being. I only wish there would be no need for war memorials, I wish they could be for achievments of peaceful kind. You have shown us those as well, Melvyn, like the bravery in the helicopter recently. Still, you always bring us an excellent piece of history with your pictures and stories, Ireland is proud and should be, without our history , who are we? Thank you for this post, making us come to a halt for a moment!

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    1. Dear Solveig, Thank you for your words and appreciation.

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  6. A lovely tribute. It is unusual to hear much about the women's role, something I will do a bit more research on. Thanks for the starting point xxxx

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    1. Am glad that you appreciated this particular blog post Fran. The role's that the women and girls was extraordinary to say the least. Good luck on your research and here is another link
      http://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/cumann-na-mban-by-joseph-e-a-connell-jr/

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