Tuesday, 28 June 2016

VIEWS TO SOOTHE

Whenever I see this building to me it looks like a magnet.
It is in fact an old forge near a river.

Looking at this you might think the photographer was drunk, but no the
road is on the slant.



The half door to a delightful home



You could see this on a calendar. It is what we call a preserved cottage.



He was very inquisitive and friendly
until I picked up the camera!





27 comments:

  1. Like very colour front door, it would cheer you up every time you arrived home xxx

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    1. It certainly would Fran, thank you for commenting xx

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  2. I love that sloping lane - as somebody rightly said (sorry about it being English, but I am sure could also apply to Irish) 'The Rolling English Drunkard made the rolling English Road.'

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    1. Oh thank you Weaver !
      Yes, as the English were over here then they can also be blamed for the state of some of the country roads, gosh I would never have thought of that until you mentioned it :-) :-) xx

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    2. Come back to Europe, will U?

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    3. Sorry but you are in error I live in the Republic of Ireland and it is not us who are leaving the EU but the English!

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    4. Whoops ! I have made an error it is not just the English, it is also the Welsh, the Northern Irish and possibly the Scots too.

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  3. That last photo made me laugh! That's a very cute looking cottage but I think I would have to stoop to get through the door.

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    1. Hello Sue, am glad to have made you laugh with the dog running away from me all I can think of is that he camera shy!
      You would have to stoop if you ever visited us too, for our door height is only 5'-6" or 1.98 metres - I think it was done to conserve heat loss ?
      Thanks for the comments.

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  4. Awesome pics and thoughts, friend Heron ... I still have a friend in Europe that I visit on occasion ... it's an oak tree ... prolly a few hundred years old ... I sat in his branches a lot as a child ... and he loved me and loved him ... smiles ... Love, cat.

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    1. Thank you Cat glad you like the photo's.
      Am not surprised that the grand old Oak loved you and on seeing your photo I can see why :-) xxx

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  5. These views DID soothe. And the last made me laugh. Thanks.

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    1. You are very welcome Mitch, thanks for the comment.

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  6. The red door should be framed, on a wall, for early morning viewing.

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    1. Ha! Ha' Well Joanne you may get out your artist's paint set and make your own picture :-)

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  7. Great photos Heron. I have seen similar new constructions of Irish cottages at Bunratty Castle and Muckross farm.

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    1. Thanks for the comment Dave greatly appreciated. The cottage on here is an original one that has stood there for a great many a years. None of yer plastic paddy ones for us in The Midlands :-)

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  8. The roof makes me want to be a kid again as I would be angling to slide down it!!

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    1. Well Carol you would soon wear the thatch away and your parents wouldn't be too pleased at having to pay for a new roof :-)
      Thank you for the comment and in making me laugh xx

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  9. These pictures may be smile, thank you. Sarah x

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    1. That is really nice to know Sarah that I have spread a bit of happiness :-) xxx

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  10. The first building is wonderfully charming and quirky and I like it. The thatched cottage is more like the white houses of the southern islands of the Outer Hebrides. I've always had a love of pictures of doors so this post was a hit with me as well as being my first visit.

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    1. Hello Graham thanks for visiting.
      I have an admission to make and need to explain: what I described as "a half door" is actually two doors. There is a half door in front of a full length door. In summertime the full door opens inwards and the half stays put, it opens outwards on the opposite side to the full door.
      Not surprised at the similarity of Hebridean cottages and ours. For I too noticed a sameness between the small rural houses of Dumfries and those in our locality.

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    2. I thought the door(s) looked unusual but I hadn't worked that out (lack of thinking is one of my specialities).

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    3. Oh' well never mind Graham!
      The mention of a half door would probably set most people thinking of a stable door :-)

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