Sunday, 1 June 2014

Stone Rings & Dry Sailors

The other day we went on a days' tour to some ancient sites.
About 3 miles outside of Tullow, Co.Carlow on the N81, we made our first stop to view the stone that ultimately led to the death of Niall of the Nine Hostages, according to Irish mythology. For it was here that he chained Eochaid, son of Énnae Cennsalach,a king of Leinster. However, all did not bode well as Eochaid broke free and killed his captors - the nine warriors who Niall had sent to kill him. Some years later Eochaid executed further retribution by killing Niall in Scotland with an arrow.

More recently this ancient stone was used in the healing of children suffering from rickets by passing them through the hole.


photo by courtesy of Voices of the Dawn


Our second stop was to introduce our friends to The Chocolate Garden ref:http://aheronsview.blogspot.ie/2014/05/chocolate-ice-cream.html  
You can see from the photo what effect a surfeit of chocolate cake did to these two lads. Mrs H and I are of course immune from such antics, due to making regular visits to such establishments.




The High and Dry Sailors


The highlight of our tour and the jewel in the crown of the area was found about ten minutes drive away from the Chocolate Garden. An ancient site which the locals refer to as The Ring of the Rath or more formally Rathgall, sign-posted as Rath Geal - it matters not for this was the seat of The Kings of Leinster.

An ariel shot of Rathgall

Of all of the old places that I have visited this one has the most amazingly powerful earth energies flowing around and through the hill fort. We were all very aware of what we were experiencing as walked towards the rath. We didn't need dowsing rods or pendulums for each of us could sense the vibrant energies flowing through our bodies.

Up the pole & happy...


Entrance to the inner ring

Rathgall is a multivate hill fort, with four concentric stone walls encompassing an area of 18 acres (7.5 hectares) and encircled by mountains. The inner stone wall is roughly 1.3 metres high and the ring it encloses measures fifteen metres in diameter.
We explored the immediate area around the rath and found evidence of other stones, possible sites and a small copse.

Three 'wise' men


An inner trench


The outer perimeter wall

A blackthorn copse the home of rabbits and faeries

I do encourage all residents and visitors to Ireland to experience both of these ancient sites for am sure you will be delighted.
Parking to both places is limited to about three cars so you won't be crowded out by sightseers, plus access is an easy walk.

27 comments:

  1. What a beautiful place & hoewconvenient it was near the chocolate garden ;) also thank you for the phonecall to remind us how wonderful the chocolate & ice-creams are whilst you were partaking!! Most kind! The junior herons await our food parcel .......

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    1. Thank you for your remarks Snappy. We thoroughly enjoyed our day out. The parcels will be posted on Tuesday for we have Whit bank holiday tomorrow.

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  2. I had my wife get me a fairly large book on Irish folk legends while she worked at a book store years ago, and I never got around to reading it. What an idiot--huh? It is now packed away in one of the boxes full of books at the bottom of the pile of our "treasures" that almost completely fills our garage. Sigh.

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    1. That's an awful shame Jerry. Though never mind for I often put up links to on-line sources and you can generally follow through from one web site to another.

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  3. An enchanted place, Mel! The setting is very beautiful! The Dutch word for enchanted is 'betoverd'. It's a word I learnt yesterday, so it seems quite fitting that I should be reminded of it here. Lovely, and I can well understand why the 'young men' got frisky :-)

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    1. Thank you for your observations Val. 'Betoverd' has a great ring to it even when said in English.
      Those 'young' men in the boat will be greatly pleased when they read your comment about being frisky for at times they most certainly develop that characteristic.

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  4. I know what you mean about earth energies, Heron. I could feel similar energies when we touched the standing stones at Drombeg stone circle here in county Cork. Makes me think of that Clannad song: Newgrange.

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    1. Thank you for understanding of earth energies Dave and Rathgall's were the strongest I have ever felt.
      Unfortunately, I don't believe that have ever heard the Clannad song -Newgrange, but I will seek it out.

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  5. what a cool and mystical place this is. love all the beauty. those grey stone walls, the blossoms and the whole idea of the place,

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    1. Your appreciation is wonderful Gwen, personally I feel that it would make you dance.

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  6. Enjoyed the tour, photos and, earth energy. Thanks for sharing.

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  7. Perfect example of too much sugar!!! The Ring of Rath looks beautiful and I love the history narrative xxx

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    1. Fran, I thought that you of all people would have appreciated the 'high as a kite sailors' with your nautical associations ?

      Thank you for visiting the blog and for the appreciative comments.

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  8. There is certainly no shortage of ancient sites in Ireland - a country both the farmer and I love dearly.
    That photograph of the May blossom is incredible - being so much further West than we are I would have thought your Hawthorn would have been over weeks ago - did you take the photo some time ago?

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    1. Thank you for your comments Weaver. Am glad to read that you and the Farmer are fans of Ireland.
      Our trip to Rathgall was on Thursday 29th May, so it was only 5 days ago when the photo's were taken.
      Yes, we are further West than Yorkshire but only about one hundred miles further South than the city of York, plus we are generally a few degrees cooler and all of those factors make a difference .

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  9. Very interesting post Heron. I need that energy. Thank you.

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  10. We took a hiking holiday in Ireland some years back, and i felt those energies you describe in many places, especially at the Burren.

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    1. Thank you for sending a comment Megan. Yes am sure that you came into contact with those energies and the Burren is dotted with many Raths & Dolmens too.

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  11. Definitely on my "to see" list. Thanks

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  12. Carmel D said
    OMG! that was a real treat to see such an amazing place through your photographs. The energy just jumps off the screen at me :) Thank you for sharing.

    Thanks also for the great laugh at the high and dry sailors ;) LOL

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    1. Am very glad that you enjoyed it and I hope that you will find the time to make a personal visit to Rathgall.
      Just go easy on the chocolate if you happen to stray !

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  13. Isn't that first photo the MkI wheel?

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    1. Ha, ha, ha !
      Bill, It may very well be a forerunner as it is about three thousand plus years old.

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