Monday, 11 November 2013

An Old Singer !

This seventy-six year old lady is still working well. In fact after having being given a good dousing of three in one oil recently on her moving parts. Her owner declared that she is better than ever.

Her Singer number is EB 326703 from which I was able to ascertain, that her birth was at
Kilbowie, Clydebank, Scotland in June 1937.


Mrs H bought her for £20 in London about thirty plus years ago. Inside the 'green box is a
Singer counterfoil (possibly the original) however, unfortunately the figures are ineligible.

I personally view this machine as a piece of art work and greatly admire the gold decorations that it has, them and the decorative cover plates which I think are absolutely splendid.

The Singer Sewing Machine model 28k


Shewing cover plate at business
end of machine.


An inverted pear shaped cover
plate.

I obtained details of year and place of manufacture from http://www.sewshop.com/date-your-machine.html and from them they have this to say :-
"Singer Sewing Machines were first manufactured in 1851. The manufacture dating provided here on our Web site is reproduced from the original Company register number log books. Because we have not been able to locate the log books, serial numbers for the years 1851 to 1870 are not available at this time. 
Serial numbers on Singer sewing machines manufactured prior to 1900 are numbers only. After 1900, the machine serial numbers have a single or two-letter prefix."

20 comments:

  1. They really are beautiful items to own aren't they. I can't imagine what it must have been like to go out and buy one in 1937-very exciting I should have thought, but I wonder for how much.
    I am also the proud owner of a 1975 Singer Sewing Machine, here's the post I did when I got home http://brixhamlife.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/i-didnt-buy-it-on-ebay.html

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  2. Thank you for your comments Suzie. I will return to your blog and take a peek at your machine.

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  3. TRISTRAM said:
    RIGHT ON !! you just dated my old singer I have one very close to that
    you just boosted the evaluation a lot !!
    hyo great surprise years ago a sewing machine rep offered
    my mom $ 15.00 for it I gave her $20 and still have it........
    WoW !!

    thanks Heron
    I'll keep her a few yew years and find the serial number


    Tristram....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Tris,
      The identification number on your Singer machine might be underneath. Another way of identifying it is via the decals so copy this into your browser
      http://www.ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/decals/domestic-decals.html

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  4. delightful! I have a similar machine, unfortunately, is has lost it's lid to the supplies compartment at the side.

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    Replies
    1. Hello Kath. Thank you for your interest. Actually not all of the machines had lids
      to the compartment tray; Some just had a close fitting tin box and others a black lid that sat on top of the box flush with the machines bed.

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  5. This machine has been part of my life for so long - over 30 years now and is still working well.
    I love the fact that she is beautiful as well as being practical.
    Sad that machines these days are so boring and bland.

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    Replies
    1. Totally agree with you regards the loss of the decals.

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  6. what a Treasure!!! they don't make machines like this anymore.. Beauty, Quality and Function all in one.. one of my favourite combinations!

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    Replies
    1. Am sure that with proper use and a regular drops of oil, it will continue to serve for many more years.

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  7. This brings back such memories for me, Mel and Jane. My grandfather was a tailor, so my mother had his old singer sewing machine, and luxury upon luxuries, it was electric, but it also had a lovely old treadle in case you didn't want to use electricity. Fantastic, and also with the beautiful gold design. I had a hand operated one myself much like yours Jane. I loved it too. Sigh. I wish I still had one. Thank you for letting us see yours. It looks in perfect condition!

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    Replies
    1. Delighted to revive your memories Val and thank you for sharing them with us too.

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  8. I have got one almost the same that I inherited from my grandmother many years ago and I love it. Much more manageable than a new fangled electric one! I am now off to date mine, thanks for the link xxx

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    Replies
    1. Hello Fran! You are correct they look so very simple to use. In fact I said to Jane last night they appear so easy in application; that if I were younger I might have learnt how to use one...... :-)

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  9. hello Jane and Mel, What a wonderful treasure you have there. A true piece of craftmanship. They don't make them like that now. My Grandmother had one too, My mother had one but it was a tredle, most of our clothes were made on it.....oh the memories..
    Margaret x

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    Replies
    1. Hello Margaret good to hear from you. Actually Jane bought the machine to make clothes with as well and also to sell some of them under her own label.
      An enterprising woman is our Jane :)

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  10. They are lovely old machines. When I bought my electric one, I put my Singer, which I had had since new, into the boxroom. A few months ago a local chap was taking a lorry load of various things to Africa for distribution and I gave him my sewing machine and a large jar full of cotton. I like to think it is working merrily and providing somebody somewhere with a living.

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    Replies
    1. I am sure that it is and will last them for many years.

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  11. I have a plain, black Singer, not sure how old, but thanks to your information, I may be able to find out. Yours looks delightful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Megan thank you for your comment. I was looking at some of the Singer photos and there were quite a few models that were virtually totally black, depending on where they were manufactured. The ones made in Germany often had red flowers on them and another, a British one had Queen Victoria on the base plate.

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