Saturday, 14 May 2016

River Bedrock

Our local river has for many a year caught my attention. It is twenty-five years ago that I first took over this small cottage on Monday13th May and no happier man would have been found on the whole of this island than me that day. A roof over my head belonging to no one else, mine to do with in whatever way took my fancy - a home of my very own.

On warm summer days I would take a day off and walk down to the meandering River Barrow and find for myself a cosy place on it's banks where I was able to sit out of sight from anyone. Remove from my rucksack a bottle of wine, sip away and enjoy the day, all the while listening to the sounds of nature that surrounded me.

A few days ago I went over the bank to pay my respects to Berbha, she who is known to be the Goddess of the River Barrow and perhaps it is from her that the name originates, well that is the suggestion in the Annals of the Four Masters written in AD 996. There are others who think and believe otherwise that the name has it's origins elsewhere and is an Anglicised form of a word in Old Irish for boiling that links to the goddess Morrigan.
The geology of this part of Ireland is to my
mind absolutely mind blowing

Bedrock at the side of the Barrow
 which I was taking a photo of above. You cannot but see all of the fossils
So from what part of the world is their origin?
Well according to the geologists the mud that captured 
them
was once a river bed in Africa .

The fossil rock is just behind this small weir.

I often tell my new African friends that the reason that they feel so at home in Ireland is because it is their bedrock that is under our feet.




18 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your 25th anniversary in such a beautiful place. The fossils are fascinating and isn't it amazing to know they were once in Africa xx

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    1. Thank you Teresa I was lucky in finding such a good place to live in.
      Yes, geology is a fascinating subject. The African rocks are not just found in Ireland but all over Europe which just shows what an upheaval the land mass of our world went through; rather like the climate it is never in the long term completely stable, sort of puts a perspective on life doesn't it ?

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  2. Heron, I can understand your fascination with the place - it looks a delight.

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    1. Thank you Pat and am pleased to read that you had a good holiday.

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  3. Happy anniversary to you and your lovely home, Mel! I love the idea too of those pieces of Africa in your bedrovk. Maybe that's why I love Ireland too! A lovely post!

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    1. You know I was thinking of both yourself and Hilary when I wrote the blog and that you could so easily have come here if there was a desire to put your feet on ancient Africa :)

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  4. Hi Mel - on looking up the Four Masters ... I see 1616 was the date they mention - another co-incidence of life ... four hundred years on ...

    Our lands certainly have moved and we did come up from below the equator ... fascinating to see the rocks and fossils ...

    Then your cottage - what a delightful find ... and a great comfort to always be there for it and it for you ... have a happy week ahead - cheers Hilary

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    1. Thank you Hilary and please see my reply to Val ;-)

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  5. What an interesting post. Serious land movement. There's always been something about water that draws me.

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    1. Ah' now Water is an element of many moods that needs to be treated with respect at all times....
      Thank you for your comments Janet.

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  6. I can't but think that you and mrs H are such lucky people!! Mindblowing settings at the river, holy wells and serene gardens with chairs that make your backpart crack, how good can life actually become?? And Ireland once so close to Africa?It reminds me of a funny story grandfather told me: One man to the other: We have
    a new fellow working at the buildingsite, he's from Kenya. The other one; Kenya? Is that far away? The first; I reckon not, he takes the bike every day!
    No this is no laughing matter, this is interesting... I do envy you that magnificent scenery, but we do have some mindblowers up here too. It's one of the minds treats to let itself go down an alley of unspoken history when confronted with times way past. And water is indeed also a source of amazement, the power of it!!

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    1. Thank you for your joke which made me smile a lot!
      Yes, Ireland is a fascinating country to live in, for around every corner is a different scene and the land has a lot of history on and below the surface.
      The placid river that gently flows over the rocks becomes a raging torrent after heavy rain - that is its nature all over the world and given time reshapes the ground that it passes through for there is no constancy.

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  7. You're right about the geology being mind blowing! And what a beautiful spot for contemplation.

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    1. Thank you Mitchell, it is a comfortable walk of about 1 mile away from home.

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  8. Hello Mel!
    Wonderful photos and thought-full post.
    So happy for your 25 years is such a splendid place!

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    1. A great many thanks Carol and am looking forward to the next twenty-five :-)

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  9. What a wonderful place, I can see why you have been happy for 25 years. Congratulations xxx

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    1. I am, I am and am happy to share :) Thank you xx

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