Monday, 7 November 2016

Odds and Ends

This squat round tower is situated somewhere I know not where
in the west of Co. Kilkenny.


Grangefertagh round tower which as usual claims to be one 
of the tallest in Ireland.


Grangefertagh Abbey, Co. Kilkenny.
The most oddest thing about the building that part of it was converted into a ball alley ! 
Which is something that I never seen done before, however both now are in ruin.





In a corner of a farmer's field called Ladywell in Co. Laois sits this shrine to 
She, to whom I know as  the Ever present Goddess, Christians know her by other names.


This is me your host in my druid garb
I am showing it to prove that we don't all
wear white robes.




24 comments:

  1. Ireland is such a different place. When we visited I expected it to be like England, but it's not, a different feel altogether.

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    1. That is correct Janet. Ireland is very very different than England.

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  2. Hi Mel - that looks a wonderful gown - Druid's cloth ... Impressive. Amazing towers ... When was the ball alley? A different sort of Irish ball game?!?! Cheers Hilary

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    1. Hello Hilary thank you for the appreciation of my robe, the quality is needed when doing ritual out of doors on cold nights.
      Irish Handball was played in teams of four and consisted of hitting a ball against a wall with your hand or fist in such a style that the opposing team were unable to hit it. The first alleys were built in the late 60's, it seems now to have lost its popularity as most are now in ruins.

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  3. Nice little tour of one part of Ireland - such beautiful photographs.
    You look most distinguished in that robe.

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    1. Pat, your appreciation warms my heart - thank you :-)

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  4. Should I return to the U.K. I must venture across the seas to Ireland - never been there. Looks and sounds wonderful. In fact it may be better to go to Ireland with a side trip to visit friends and rellies in England and Wales.

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    1. Most certainly make a visit to Ireland a priority and then only visit England and Wales as a side trip.
      Many thanks for your comment Susan.

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  5. Hello Mel!
    Once again you have created a delightful and interesting post. And yes, I did think that you used more than those white robes. That one is very nice on you!! Your own trade perhaps?? Are you handy with the needle??
    Those buildings, those buildings, that landscape is most enchanting. England as a sidetrip...well...hmm This is a message from FT, please don't delete!!

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    1. Tailoring has never been one of my skills FT other than a knowledge of what looks good on me !

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  6. I think if I climbed that tower it would collapse, it looks rather wobbly

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    1. Well, Simon considering that our strong gale force winds have yet to bring down the towers. Then I very much doubt that your weight would harm them but do have a fun climb :-)

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  7. I confess to knowing little or nothing about Druids or Druidry. The belief, religion or practice didn't feature in my comparative religion phase.

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    1. Thank you for the comment Graham.
      I am not surprised that the Druid practice did not focus in your studies and am rather glad about that. I have never ever considered the Druid practise to be a religion in any sense at all. Being a Druid is for me a way of life, a philosophy, part of my psyche as a human being. I do not worship or pray to any particular historical religious figure/s.
      Having said that the Celtic pantheon has a great many deities whom I personally recognise as being mythical archetypes, not though as active spiritual beings - for example: such as is the relationship between Christians and their God and the god like beings of Jesus and Mary.

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  8. Ireland has so many mysterious ruins. It is easy to be awed by the amount of effort that went into the construction of pre-Christian and early Christian structures. One would have thought that the struggle to simply survive would have left little spare time for hewing stone and carting it to remote locations before building commenced.

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    1. Ha'h yes I understand what you say indeed it has crossed my mind to that, yet the same can be levelled at all nations during their various civilisations.
      Thank you for your interesting comment.

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  9. I think the squat round tower in west Kilkenny might be a pigeon house. Pigeons were kept instead of chickens at one time, many of the abbeys around the country have pigeon houses.

    Then again maybe it was the round tower for the fatter monks. ;)

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    1. Well 'Hello young woman very good of you too write"
      You may very well be correct about the squat tower however, there is no sign of a church within the vicinity and for some unknown reason I thought that it's origins might be Welsh-Norman (?)
      Of course I shall not press the point for I dislike crossing swords with a lady such as yourself xxx

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  10. Lovely pics, that round tower does look a little precarious but looks are deceiving .....
    However dear Grandpa Heron you look dashing & may I say handsome in your robe xx

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    1. Thank you my child and Blessings upon you and yours.

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  11. The round tower is very impressive. Never seen one that tall before.

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    1. Oh there are lots of round towers scattered around the countryside and each claims to be the tallest :-)

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