Tuesday, 15 November 2016

An Ancient Irish Custom

Hazel


Fosterage is an ancient Irish custom where children were placed with an elder to be educated and reared in the ways of the clan. 

So perhaps it is of no surprise that this school of thought is also the hereditary method of rearing the young by those of the otherworld, namely the Sidhe or as some would term them the Faerie Folk.

Many of you will already know of our long term resident, the truculent and sometimes irascible Hazel who has a fondness for more than a drop of the hard stuff, though as he frequently reminds me, it is just his nature and who can argue with that, for he is one of natures’ beings.

We arose the other morning and Hazel was missing from his normal abode. Not a sight nor sound came from the undergrowth where he rests and with no tracks to follow we did not bother to do a search. He was gone from us for several days and so we concluded that he was off on an important mission.

I felt that he would be back by the time of the next Full Moon, it being an important one.
It is at this time of year, especially when the moon is bright, that he and the lads have many a game of hurling at midnight, running up and down the pitch that lies between the two ancient Whitethorns that stand within three hundred yards to the south of our cottage.

Yesterday was a chilly winter’s day, being one of those when you are glad to be indoors with the heat of the stove flowing over your back, warming you into a sleepy contentedness. 
So here was I, sitting in the corner of the front room at my desk staring idly at the computer screen in a world of my own, when the room suddenly went black. The only light came from the screen so my eyes went to the window to see what the cause of the darkness was. Peering through the glass I saw a giant dressed in colourful stripy trousers.


You can imagine how shocked I was. 
I grabbed my robe from the peg where it always hangs, draped it around me then went outside.
There he was. An eight foot tall Hazel standing in the backyard next to the hedge. 
Well, I had often been told that they were capable of re-sizing themselves but this was the first time that I had been a witness to that fact.


Giant Hazel and little me.

The giant Hazel smiled warmly at me and said

“ I hope that my size did not frighten you,
 if you would just close your eyes for three seconds I will return to my normal height.”


“I am glad that you have returned to us,” I replied, “you have been missed, Hazel and my intuition told me you were on an important mission so I didn’t worry. 


“ Yes, you were right, a very important mission indeed,” answered Hazel.
“I have brought my fosterling to stay, her name is Droocta. As is the custom she will stay in her pod for the next five years.”

Hazel pointed to the stone circle so I turned to see a strange, green pod sitting amongst the leaves.


A strange pod amongst the leaves.

“ Errrr, what can I say? I hope that you will have fun together.” I stammered.


Let me tell you, Droocta is a strange looking child, of different proportions to human children; but  part of creation nonetheless.



Hazel and Droocta

When I left them Hazel was sitting in the circle with Droocta in her pod upon his lap. 
They both seemed very happy.

I really wanted to ask him if the five years that Droocta had to stay in the pod was in their time or ours, for there is, as you probably know, a big difference. 
So do you my readers in the blogging world have any friends like Hazel ?

© MRL 2016

For further Hazel stories please click on links below








25 comments:

  1. This sounds to me like the very best perfect Irish blarney. No I don't have any friends like this, but I wish I did.

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    1. To have friends like these you need to learn to cultivate a few Pat, thank you for commenting

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  2. How wonderful to see Hazel again, we are eagerly awaiting Elfies visit over here, he generally blows in from the north pole as the final November night gently unfolds into December. We catch a glimpse of a red foot & a tinkle of his hats bell & by the morning hes delivered our festive tree & sits proud in the branches watching his young human! X

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    1. I am so glad that you have cultivated some good and useful friends among Elvyns, then I suppose it has become part of
      your family tradition as it is mine. Thank you for contributing.

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  3. In the swedish folklore we have goblins, dressed in red, green and grey. They are small and were thought to take care of the horses and cows in the barn and keep the house safe. You were to treat them nice, otherwise they would play trickery on you and gladly create a mess. They wanted food, so especially around christmas you would put out a bowl of porridge or milk and cookies. One of the older ladies in my parish, born and brought up in this ancient landscape, once told me she saw a goblin sitting content in the sun on a rock in the sunshine, when she was in the forest picking berries as a child. I rest my case.. The sight of you and that Hazel was a very sweet little tale, we don't have anything equal to that. As far as christmas goes, we made an exchange; goblins for Father Christmas. Actually, before we began speaking of Santa, we had a goat....yes, a goat, a tall one, dressed in a robe( not like yours) and handing presents to the good children and coal to the bad!!! We could have a great time, comparing folklore, legends and fairytails, Mel!! Thank you for this enchanting post!! I especially enjoyed the handycraft in those two, colours, shapes and fabric. Nice. The thought of children being taken care of was nice too. Sorry Mel, I have no elfs in my guestbook.

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    1. Many thanks for your interesting addition to this blog FT. With comments like yours who could ask for anything better, it is good to read about Sweden and your Elves.

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  4. This is the first time I have met Hazel. A delightful tale, you have made me chuckle as I drink my morning cup of tea. This is surely going to be a good day. (I think Sydney is too busy and noisy for any faeries, they wouldn't like the city life.)

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    1. Thank you Sue! What is life without chuckles and laughter (?) plus I really enjoyed meeting Hazel again and sharing the yarn with you all :-)

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  5. I love this! And I want a [bath]robe like yours. I WISH I had a Hazel and a Droocta.

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    1. Bath robe indeed you saucy pup :-) ha' ha' ha' I am wearing my druid robe. I dare say that Hazel Droocta have relations in Spain too and you only have to look around the open countryside to find them.

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  6. I was raised by ma adopted grand parents and never new my dad ... One day they handed me a necklace with Thor's Hammer dangling from it ... from my absent dad for me to keep for good luck ... had much luck so far in my 60 years here, friend H ... anyway ...thanks, dad. Love, cat.

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    1. Hello Cat good to hear from you and glad that you have a protection device that works for you. As I always say to each their own xx

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  7. Such an interesting custom and story. I never heard about Hazel before.

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    1. Thanks Bill glad you liked the story and if you want to read more of Hazel's antics put the name in the search box top of page where it says search box or wait for me to put up links - that might not be until tomorrow afternoon as am going to be busy in the morning.

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  8. Alas we have no Hazel, we have the Donald.

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    1. Ah' now I know that is not true Janet because some of the Irish faeries travelled over with their Clans when they emigrated and there is a lot of knowledge about them to be sought out.

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  9. I have all sort of friends. Every one should have a few fairies and such as friends.
    Coffee is on

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  10. I'm wondering whether it was Hazel who had been imbibing the hard stuff!

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    1. Oh' most definitely, if not Hazel then certainly one of his type. Just keep an eye on your stock of spirits in your drinks cabinet Graham for any discrepancies can surely be blamed on 'the other folk' :-)
      Thank you for your observation.

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  11. Hi Mel - what fun ... I'm sure Hardwick will find some pixies in due course and write some stories about them ... Hardwick was my mother's special 'dog' that kept her company and he's here now ... awaiting the storyteller to arise and get on with things ... My mother loved her friends and talked often of them ... what a lovely informative post ... cheers Hilary

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    1. Hello Hilary! You have made some very interesting and informative comments. About which I can only reply, by saying that you will need a keen pair of ears and an acute sense of humour.. which I know that you have. xx

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  12. You are very lucky to have a friend like Hazel. Fairies are said to be about in Devon, notable sightings at Lupton House (which is quite close), so maybe if I concentrate hard enough they might take a trip to my little garden!

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    1. Thank you for your comment Suzie. Yes, Devon has lots of Faerie Folk,in fact they are in every rural area and people don't see them now because of street lights and very few people walk through the fields or across the moorland areas. The obsessive use of the car has removed almost all contact with nature spirits.

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